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[[Ficheiro:Afghan Girl Scouts 1950s.jpg|miniatura|esquerda|200px|Mulleres afgás participando nun programa da Asociación afgá de Scout a finais da década de [[1950]].]]
 
A [[Unión Soviética]] exercera unha grande influencia na política afgá, dende a infraestrutura civil e militar á sociedade.<ref name="BBC, 1979"/> Na década de [[1980]], moitos afgás dominaban a lingua rusa.<ref name="BBC, 1979"/> Dende [[1947]], Afganistán estivera baixo a influencia do goberno ruso e recibira importantes axudas, en forma de asistencia económica e adestramento e armamento militar.
The [[Union of Soviet Socialist Republics]] (USSR) had been a major power broker and influential mentor in [[Politics of Afghanistan|Afghan politics]], ranging from civil-military infrastructure to Afghan society.<ref name="BBC, 1979"/> In the 1980s, many Afghans were Russian language proficient.<ref name="BBC, 1979"/> Since 1947, Afghanistan had been under the influence of the Russian government and received large amounts of aid, economic assistance, military equipment training and military hardware from the Soviet Union.
 
The economic assistance and aid had been provided to Afghanistan as early as 1919, shortly after the [[Russian Revolution of 1917|Russian Revolution]] and when the regime was facing the [[Russian Civil War]]. Provisions were given in the form of [[small arms]], ammunition, a few aircraft, and (according to debated Soviet sources) a million gold [[ruble]]s to support the resistance during the [[Third Anglo-Afghan War]]. In 1942, the USSR again moved to strengthen the [[Afghan Armed Forces]], by providing small arms and aircraft, and establishing training centers in [[Tashkent]] ([[Uzbek Soviet Socialist Republic]]). Soviet-Afghan military cooperation began on a regular basis in 1956, and further agreements were made in the 1970s, which saw the USSR send advisers and specialists. The Soviet Union built an extensive amount of infrastructure, notably giving assistance building the [[Kabul University]], [[Polytechnical University of Kabul|Polytechnical institutes]], [[Kabul Medical University|hospitals]], civilian infrastructure, power plants, and local schools. During the 1980s, Soviets established the universities in [[Balkh University|Blakhe]], [[Herat University|Herate]], [[Takhar University|Takhar]], [[Nangarhar University|Nangarhar]] and [[Faryab Higher Education Institute|Fariyab]] provinces. The Russian faculty soon joined the universities, teaching Afghan students in proficient Russian languages.
 
TheAfganistán economicxa assistancerecibiu andaxuda aideconómica hadrusa beenno provided to Afghanistan as early asano 1919, shortlypouco afterdespois theda [[RussianRevolución RevolutionRusa ofde 1917|RussianRevolución RevolutionRusa]], andcando wheno thenovo regimegoberno wasse facingenfrontaba theá [[RussianGuerra Civil WarRusa]]. Provisions were given in the form of [[small arms]], ammunition, a few aircraft, and (according to debated Soviet sources) a million gold [[ruble]]s to support the resistance during the [[Third Anglo-Afghan War]]. In 1942, the USSR again moved to strengthen the [[Afghan Armed Forces]], by providing small arms and aircraft, and establishing training centers in [[Tashkent]] ([[Uzbek Soviet Socialist Republic]]). Soviet-Afghan military cooperation began on a regular basis in 1956, and further agreements were made in the 1970s, which saw the USSR send advisers and specialists. The Soviet Union built an extensive amount of infrastructure, notably giving assistance building the [[Kabul University]], [[Polytechnical University of Kabul|Polytechnical institutes]], [[Kabul Medical University|hospitals]], civilian infrastructure, power plants, and local schools. During the 1980s, Soviets established the universities in [[Balkh University|Blakhe]], [[Herat University|Herate]], [[Takhar University|Takhar]], [[Nangarhar University|Nangarhar]] and [[Faryab Higher Education Institute|Fariyab]] provinces. The Russian faculty soon joined the universities, teaching Afghan students in proficient Russian languages.
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In 1978, President [[Mohammed Daoud Khan|Daud Khan]] began to take initiatives for building the massive military after witnessing the [[India]]'s nuclear test, ''[[Smiling Buddha]]'', to counter Pakistan's [[Pakistan Armed Forces|armed forces]] and Iranian [[Iranian military|military influence]] in Afghanistan's politics. A final pre-war treaty, signed in December 1978, allowed the PDPA to call upon the Soviet Union for military support.<ref>{{cite book|title=The Soviet Afghan-War: How a Superpower Fought and Lost|author=The Russian General Staff|editor=Lestwer W. Grau, Michael A. Gress|publisher=[[University Press of Kansas]]|page=10|isbn=0-7006-1186-X|year=2002}}</ref>
{{rcita|right|We believe it would be a fatal mistake to commit ground troops. [...] If our troops went in, the situation in your country would not improve. On the contrary, it would get worse. Our troops would have to struggle not only with an external aggressor, but with a significant part of your own people. And the people would never forgive such things"|Alexei Kosygin, the Chairman of the USSR Council of Ministers, in response to Taraki's request for Soviet presence in Afghanistan<ref>{{cite book | author = Walker, Martin | title = The Cold War and the Making of the Modern World | publisher = [[HarperCollins|Fourth Estate]] | year = 1993 | isbn = 978-1-85702-004-9 | page = 253 }}</ref>|}}
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